The Art of Woodworking

Technology has made life easier with innovations coming up. The wood working sector has developed from a necessity to a form of art and expression. In the past, one would spend gruesome hours with simple tools to try and make wood work. Based on the amount of work involved in the past, there were very few wood artisans with most of them focusing on furniture for homes and offices. But that is slowly changing thanks to a company called Kerf Cases.

Ben Saks, the founder, is one of the few people who has worked with wood for a large part of his life. The word worker uses wood to create phone cases and antique cabinetry.According to TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2017/04/17/pittsburghs-kerf-cases-enrobes-your-phone-in-fine-wood/), Saks created his first phone case while using a manual milling machine. During the time he was working at Carnegie Mellon University.Over six months he perfected his design and became an artist residency at AlphaLab Gear then later moved to Techship Pittsburg. Once he saw how cool and attractive his art was, he opened his institution in Pittsburg East End.

Currently, he makes cases for Pixel and iPhones. They are available in various woods such as cherry, maple, mahogany, and walnut. The pieces are from salvaged trees, and Saks also makes iPad accessories and wallets. Kerf originates from the wood working term which is the thickness of material derived from a saw blade. It is measured in 1/1000 of an inch which is a representation of the precision required to make the wood cases.

The artist believes that every piece of wood has a story despite its origin with its wood working a way of continuing with the story. Saks maintains to him Kerf is not a startup since its value proposition is not scalable like software. To him scaling would lead to losing the essential aspect of the business. The company has grown organically and at a steady pace through a dedicated fan base and word of mouth.